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View Full Version : Post a random/unique/weird fact about your culture


Berianidze
11-21-2006, 10:16 PM
Post something obscure, not widely-known, or just something that makes your culture unique.

For instance,
in Georgia, the tamada (or anybody else for that matter) NEVER makes a toast to someone with beer unless you wish them bad luck; if you want to wish someone good will, you make a toast with red wine or possibly vodka.

Draco
11-21-2006, 10:21 PM
In New Yawk English, the word "motherfucker" (or muddafucka to be phonetically correct) has 465,826,902 acceptable uses and applications.

Halo
11-21-2006, 11:12 PM
In Portugal we have a very funny expression 'Am I nigger??' which is used when someone thinks he/she was left out.

Ahknaton
11-21-2006, 11:15 PM
When playing Streetfighter II against random Maoris in fish'n'chip shops in New Zealand, it is customary to "give seconds" to your opponent by allowing him to beat you in the second round if you triumph in the first. In this manner the contest is guaranteed to go to a third round, yielding a longer gaming experience for both parties, and maximum value for money for the 40 cents invested in the contest.

Burrhus
11-21-2006, 11:20 PM
In New Yawk English, the word "motherfucker" (or muddafucka to be phonetically correct) has 465,826,902 acceptable uses and applications.

Even more in the Bronx.

Ahknaton
11-21-2006, 11:27 PM
I'm not sure whether this one is specific to New Zealand, but whenever my mother baked a Christmas cake, we used to leave a slice after each Christmas and keep it in a tin until next year, when it was crumbed and mixed into the batter for next year's cake. This provided a kind of symbolic continuity between Christmases.

Keystone
11-21-2006, 11:32 PM
I'm not sure whether this one is specific to New Zealand, but whenever my mother baked a Christmas cake, we used to leave a slice after each Christmas and keep it in a tin until next year, when it was crumbed and mixed into the batter for next year's cake. This provided a kind of symbolic continuity between Christmases.
We skip that step and just keep passing round the same fruitcake...:D

That's a nice custom, Ahknaton.

Keystone
11-21-2006, 11:37 PM
In Pittsburgh, we say "yinz" in place of the plural "you". "yinzer" for "you are".

"Yinzer all jagoffs".

I've never heard it elsewhere.

Hrolf Kraki
11-21-2006, 11:49 PM
We actually use 1337 here in everyday speech on occasion. :p

Keystone
11-21-2006, 11:50 PM
We actually use 1337 here in everyday speech on occasion. :p
Don't do that.

Hrolf Kraki
11-21-2006, 11:53 PM
Don't do that.

Why not?




..

Keystone
11-21-2006, 11:59 PM
Why not?




..
I shouldn't have to tell you...

Hrolf Kraki
11-22-2006, 12:05 AM
I shouldn't have to tell you...

It's mainly just used among people who are also on forums and is really just done as a joke. Don't take it so seriously. :rofl:

delete
11-22-2006, 12:24 AM
Marinesko (nick here on the phora) means 'navy shoes' in Norwegian. (and Danish)

Petyr Baelish
11-22-2006, 12:38 AM
I'm not sure whether this one is specific to New Zealand, but whenever my mother baked a Christmas cake, we used to leave a slice after each Christmas and keep it in a tin until next year, when it was crumbed and mixed into the batter for next year's cake. This provided a kind of symbolic continuity between Christmases.

That sounds somewhat unsanitary.

Anarch
11-22-2006, 01:35 AM
'Thongs', in Australian terminology, does not refer to that variety of female underwear, bu actually footwear known in the U.S. as 'flip flops'.

Keystone
11-22-2006, 01:37 AM
'Thongs', in Australian terminology, does not refer to that variety of female underwear, bu actually footwear known in the U.S. as 'flip flops'.
That's what it still means here.

Back in the 80's, I dated a NZ woman who called an Igloo cooler a "chilly bin." That was cute.

Ahknaton
11-22-2006, 01:48 AM
That sounds somewhat unsanitary.
You're just an atheist who hates Christmas. Christmas cakes keep for years (especially if you make them with brandy) and taste better with age.
Back in the 80's, I dated a NZ woman who called an Igloo cooler a "chilly bin." That was cute.
They call them "eskys" in Australia.

Anarch
11-22-2006, 02:17 AM
Dropbears are an evil species of koala that fall from trees and attack humans. The evil strain of koala don't actually exist rather the story was created to fool Americans.

Ahknaton
11-22-2006, 02:33 AM
Dropbears are an evil species of koala that fall from trees and attack humans. The evil strain of koala don't actually exist rather the story was created to fool Americans.
I heard about the drop bear a few months ago. Another "urban mythological being" that I like is the hoop snake, which eats it's own tail (like the ouroboros) and forms a hoop to roll after you.

Oblisk
11-22-2006, 02:37 AM
Starcraft is a national sport of South Korea.

Anarch
11-22-2006, 02:45 AM
I heard about the drop bear a few months ago. Another "urban mythological being" that I like is the hoop snake, which eats it's own tail (like the ouroboros) and forms a hoop to roll after you.
ROFL. That's stupid. I haven't heard of the hoop snake.

10 percent of Australians satisfy the definition of an 'ocker'. This 10 percent of the population consume 80 percent of the beer drunk in Australia.

Johnson
11-22-2006, 02:53 AM
Americans deep fry pizza (http://www.slashfood.com/2006/10/30/food-porn-deep-fried-pizza/).

OVERWATCH
11-22-2006, 03:04 AM
In upper-middle class suburbia, it is customary to allow other's dogs to shit in your yard, provided that the dog-owner scoops up the poop pile and carries it away; voicing your displeasure about letting a dog crap in your yard under any circumstances, makes you 'the bad guy'.

In conservative Cincinnati, and in much of conservative upper-middle class American 'culture', sporting a beard is looked down upon, and he who wears the beard is looked upon as either a leftist, a radical, or a muslim terrorist; the length of the beard being proportionate to the leftism, radicalism, or terrorism exhibited by that individual.

In the midwest, if you don't understand what someone just said, you say 'please?' instead of 'excuse me?' or 'what?'.

Never fondle someone's weapons at a gun show without obtaining express permission from the owner first.

When encountering a passerby and acknowledging one's presence, negroes will nod their head up, while whites nod their head down.

In suburbia, when your neighbour cuts his grass, it is expected for you to do the same, ASAP.

Keystone
11-22-2006, 03:10 AM
You should move to Pennsylvania. We've got beards everywhere, and we never fondle each other's weapons. I've always known we were superior to the flatlanders.

OVERWATCH
11-22-2006, 03:13 AM
You should move to Pennsylvania. We've got beards everywhere, and we never fondle each other's weapons. I've always known we were superior to the flatlanders.

Greetings, I like Pennsylvania from what I saw on my drive thru the Penn. Turnpike on my way to NYC. We have hills here, being in the OhiO river valley. We don't have mountains, and our hills are smaller, but up north is flatlander territory.

Interesting fact: we call soft drinks 'pop', not 'soda' or 'cola'.

Anarch
11-22-2006, 03:19 AM
Greetings, I like Pennsylvania from what I saw on my drive thru the Penn. Turnpike on my way to NYC. We have hills here, being in the OhiO river valley. We don't have mountains, and our hills are smaller, but up north is flatlander territory.

Interesting fact: we call soft drinks 'pop', not 'soda' or 'cola'.
We just call them soft drinks... cola (the brown sugary stuff) is known as 'coke' generally, because of 'coca cola'. Pepsi, consequently, is both coke and not coke, because 'coke' can also refer specifically to coca cola.

OVERWATCH
11-22-2006, 03:22 AM
In suburbia, it is considered improper and rude to grope soccer-moms whilst waiting at the checkout lane.

btw: during my daily twilight stroll through the neighbourhood today, I encountered a soccer-mom during my jaunt; after I nodded to her, and expressed the socially acceptable greeting of "hey there" :), I was coldly ignored, whereas the jogger behind me, decked out in traditional suburbanite athletic garb, was given an enthusiatic greeting by the beardist soccer-mom.

:mad:

It's discrimination I tell you!

Keystone
11-22-2006, 03:24 AM
Greetings, I like Pennsylvania from what I saw on my drive thru the Penn. Turnpike on my way to NYC.
That's very kind of you. It's a beautiful state outside the Pitts/Philly metroplexes. I'm biased towards our forested western end....:welcome:
Interesting fact: we call soft drinks 'pop', not 'soda' or 'cola'.
As we do.

Kriger
11-22-2006, 03:26 AM
In this section of Missouri, we like to tell outsiders that our family trees have no branches.

:rofl:

Johnson
11-22-2006, 03:49 AM
In the midwest, if you don't understand what someone just said, you say 'please?' instead of 'excuse me?' or 'what?'.

When encountering a passerby and acknowledging one's presence, negroes will nod their head up, while whites nod their head down.

European carryover. Germans say "bitte?" I imagine Scandinavians say something similar. Bork?

In Czech culture, acknowledging a passerby whom you don't know is a social faux pas. They have probably the most impersonal culture ever. In direct opposition to the nod, it's Czech social custom to stare at the ground or straight forward until the other person has passed. 'Hello' or any other verbal acknowledgement is even more awkward. Not to say that they're unfriendly (well, the women are :D), they're just distrustful of strangers I guess. A dying instinct to be sure.

Keystone
11-22-2006, 03:54 AM
European carryover. Germans say "bitte?" I imagine Scandinavians say something similar. Bork?

In Czech culture, acknowledging a passerby whom you don't know is a social faux pas. They have probably the most impersonal culture ever. In direct opposition to the nod, it's Czech social custom to stare at the ground or straight forward until the other person has passed. 'Hello' or any other verbal acknowledgement is even more awkward. Not to say that they're unfriendly (well, the women are :D), they're just distrustful of strangers I guess. A dying instinct to be sure.
Fuck that shit.

Vasily Zaitsev
11-22-2006, 04:31 AM
Among Ulster Scots all over America the "Jell-O mold" is considered food. A sure way for a woman at a picnic to display her prowess as a homemaker is to bring an elaborate Jell-O mold. Multiple layers, suspended fruit, and molds shaped like fish or with seasonal themes are all encouraged. More daring wives even put dairy in some of their layers, yielding a strange crearmy concoction that resembles baked pudding to a certain degree.

Berianidze
11-22-2006, 06:35 AM
In Georgia, at least in the cities, only hookers/prostitutes/whores smoke cigarettes in public (and almost everybody in Georgia smokes cigarettes). Decent, respectable women do not smoke cigarettes on the street.

Also, it is rude to refuse a drink when you are a guest in a Georgian home. Their goal is to get you completely shitfaced within the hour, as guests are seen as gifts from god.

kane123123/Eagle Eye/stumbler/iceman
11-22-2006, 08:07 AM
Here's our national anthem, and info on it.
http://david.national-anthems.net/us.htm

Here's the confederate anthem.
http://david.national-anthems.net/csa.htm

(I enjoy using this historic refernce of new and old anthems to look up and listen to the national anthem of badasses like brother number one, the red tzar, the fuehrer, uncle saddam, the butcher of uganda, the master of the great leap forward, kim, and Il Duce.)

Richard Parker
11-22-2006, 09:18 AM
We actually use 1337 here in everyday speech on occasion. :p
Yuck.

I seldom think of myself as too old for anything but that would be pretty freaking hard to follow.

Geist
11-22-2006, 12:43 PM
It was once customery in Irish pubs to sing the Irish National Anthem before closing time. This was a custom still going when I was around 18, but seems to have died out recently. I imagine some country pubs still do so however.

MrAngry
11-22-2006, 12:51 PM
Everything we eat is covered in Gravy, even cereal......

BillOfLanding
11-28-2006, 10:49 AM
In Portugal we have a very funny expression 'Am I nigger??' which is used when someone thinks he/she was left out.

Thats why so many people call the Portuguese "the niggers of Europe".

Portuguese people often ask who is speaking when they make a phone call while Americans do this when they answer the phone. Another interesting Portuguese trait is that many people in Portugal with a college degree insist on having the "Dr." title written on their banking cheques.

Arrow Cross
11-28-2006, 11:17 AM
Hungarian names are reversed in a way that surnames go first.

Also, Hungarian folksongs (even the drinking ones) mostly sound like funeral songs, they have a very sad tone and lyrics, because we suffered that much through history that even our celebrations are somewhat sad. :)

Sebastian
11-28-2006, 02:27 PM
We have our own unique traditional drums in Burundi.

Jimbo Gomez
11-28-2006, 03:36 PM
Saint Nicolas will bring the Flemish and Dutch children candy and toys in the night from 5th to 6th december. He won't carry the stuff himself, his negro servants do that for him.

Ahknaton
12-23-2006, 05:20 AM
Whenever a friend of mine opens a pack of cigarettes, he always takes one out and puts in back in the pack upside down. This is called "lucky smoke" and profers good luck on the bearer of the pack.

Mentious
12-23-2006, 05:57 AM
In my culture they got bored of charming towns where people walked and met each other. So they started cutting huge swaths through the towns, paved them, and encouraged everybody to go everywhere in cars. Ain't it bizarre?

Anarch
12-23-2006, 11:17 AM
Whenever a friend of mine opens a pack of cigarettes, he always takes one out and puts in back in the pack upside down. This is called "lucky smoke" and profers good luck on the bearer of the pack.

This is true. You count from one corner backwards, the amount of letters of your girlfriend. At least, that's how we did it in high school. I've almost forgotten this ritual.

Isra'il Yahya
12-24-2006, 03:49 PM
Finns differ by their tribe. Most Finns are of the quiet and solemn tavastian tribe. There are also the lively Karelians, the bragging Savonians, the nomadic reindeer Saami, the loud Estonians, and other peoples. I'm a Karelian. Very loud, very obnoxious, and very fun to be around.

Tavastians end up like everyone else after alcohol is introduced. It just is not possible for Tavastians to lighten up easily. Rye has a status almost considered holy amongst the Finns. Melancholic themes run deep in Finnish culture not just because of Finnish history, but also because of the nature of the land.

We're on good terms with other Baltic peoples and Russia. Even though we're still pretty angry at Russia. Swedes are considered to be homosexuals.