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View Full Version : Should you try and save baby birds that fall out of trees?


Ahknaton
12-13-2006, 11:52 AM
When I was a kid, my father and I found a baby bird in the park that had fallen out of a tree. We took it home and fed it, but it died after a couple of days. You can't put them back in the nest apparently, because the mother will throw it out (potentially along with one or more of its siblings) if it smells human scent on them. I've seen a lot of dead baby birds on the footpath lately on my wanderings, and I dread finding a live one because then I'll be faced with a dilemma.

Draco
12-13-2006, 11:57 AM
Yes, you can put them back. I saw a baby robin try to take its first flight, it failed, then I proceeded to return it from the ground, rescued it from my dogs mouth (he beat me to it), chased it around as it hopped away from me and while the mother dive bombed me, put it back, and it was there for about 3 more days and flew away on its own.

Lily
12-13-2006, 11:58 AM
I couldn't leave it. :(

Dr. Gutberlet
12-13-2006, 01:39 PM
if I were hungry enough, I'd consider making a snack of it.

Carlos Danger
12-13-2006, 01:45 PM
The cats of my neighborhood usually get to any fallen fledglings before I do

Bloody feathers and pieces of gore are usually all that's left by the time I arrive on the scene

Hermetic
12-13-2006, 02:46 PM
I have never found a baby bird but I have found a few grown birds with injuried wings. I just take them to the local vets same with the local stray cats when they have health issues.

Berianidze
12-13-2006, 02:49 PM
I make it a habit of being as destructive as I possibly can...so I just step on them. It makes me feel strong.

OVERWATCH
12-13-2006, 02:51 PM
I make it a habit of being as destructive as I possibly can...so I just step on them. It makes me feel strong.
I forsee a veritable tsunami of negative rep in your future.

WFHermans
12-13-2006, 02:52 PM
Those little birds could have been able to serve the cause of socialism if you hadn't crushed them Beo.

brigadier Biggles
12-13-2006, 03:10 PM
yeah i have quite a bit of bird life around here and once or twice theres been a bird fallen out which i put in the garage on top of a sheet or something and give it a chance at recovering, never tried putting a bird back into a nest as they are too high and i could get it wrong, but i consider it right to try looking after it as the bird might have at least been injurned by something manmade or even worse man himself :mad:.

Winston
12-13-2006, 04:17 PM
I have only ever seen dead ones, but I would probably attempt to help a live one. I have nursed older birds back to health and then released them. I had a crow for a while and it was one of the most intelligent creatures I've experienced.

brigadier Biggles
12-13-2006, 04:33 PM
Yes they are got a few of them round here (see my sig for pics).

MrAngry
12-13-2006, 07:21 PM
My wife and I once found a little bird in our bathroom, god knows how it got there, so we put it into a box and took it to a bird sanctuary who charged us 20 for its upkeep. Like a mug I paid up otherwise the Mrs would have bled my ears for hours. I still reckon they turfed the little blighter out and spent my cash on lager and peanuts....

The Retard
12-13-2006, 09:28 PM
The mother will abandon her nest if you mess with them, I know from experience. :(

Burrhus
12-13-2006, 09:28 PM
I know that bats aren't birds but they do fly. I found one flying in my bedroom last year. I killed it.

Janus
12-13-2006, 09:52 PM
No, nature is cruel because it's meant to be...Birds that fall from their nests should not be helped. "Compassion" is no substitute for "Natural selection".

Starr
12-13-2006, 09:56 PM
I couldn't leave it. :(


Neither could I. If I brought it home, I do have a cat which could cause some problems, however.:(

Hachiko
12-13-2006, 10:15 PM
I know that bats aren't birds but they do fly. I found one flying in my bedroom last year. I killed it.
Heartless bastard.
Don't you know the bat's cycle? First a 13 year-old girl named Shaniqua gets pregnant, doesn't tell anyone, her 25 year-old mother is too busy on the pipe to notice, she has the baby in the bathroom, and tosses it into a garbage can. This dead baby then gets it's wings and becomes a bat, haunting white homes the country over, since heaven don't want them.
True story.

kane123123/Eagle Eye/stumbler/iceman
12-13-2006, 10:16 PM
I may try to save it, but not for your reason.

Just sort of good stewardship.

Berianidze
12-13-2006, 11:07 PM
I know that bats aren't birds but they do fly. I found one flying in my bedroom last year. I killed it.
Good for you. Bat's are awful creatures. They like to climb underneath my old window air-conditioner in the summer time and my cat tries to get at them.

Burrhus
12-13-2006, 11:52 PM
Birds that fall from their nests should not be helped. "Compassion" is no substitute for "Natural selection".

Being cute which elicits compassion and sympathy is a trait selected for by natural selection also. One should never argue as though one speaks for the process of natural selection. It always speaks for itself.

Burrhus
12-13-2006, 11:54 PM
Heartless bastard.
Don't you know the bat's cycle? First a 13 year-old girl named Shaniqua gets pregnant, doesn't tell anyone, her 25 year-old mother is too busy on the pipe to notice, she has the baby in the bathroom, and tosses it into a garbage can. This dead baby then gets it's wings and becomes a bat, haunting white homes the country over, since heaven don't want them.
True story.

I knew that. Killed it anyway. It's legal during the bat stage.

Janus
12-14-2006, 12:54 AM
One should never argue as though one speaks for the process of natural selection. Darwin made a distinction between "Natural selection" and "Artifical selection". ;)

Starr
12-14-2006, 01:31 AM
http://www.fotosearch.com/comp/DSN/DSN004/1767479.jpg

Burrhus
12-14-2006, 01:57 AM
Darwin made a distinction between "Natural selection" and "Artifical selection". ;)

Darwin wasn't a philosopher, I am. As a Naturalist, (metaphysically, not an activity as for Darwin) I believe that the universe and nature are the same thing; there is only nature.

Artificial simply refers to that which requires human (or other biological entities') behavior to occur. Human behavior is in all cases natural. Therefore artificial selection is a sub-set of natural selection involving human activity. It is not different from or outside of the process of natural selection.

To believe otherwise assumes that man somehow transcends nature when he acts to produce art (in the broadest meaning of the word). I don't make that assumption. Man's behavior is firmly embedded in nature and determined according to nature's laws. Everything that we do, including artificial selection, is natural.

There is no escape from nature.

Helios Panoptes
12-14-2006, 02:03 AM
No, but not because I think doing so would be unnatural. It just seems pointless.

Johnson
12-14-2006, 02:14 AM
I try not to intervene with Darwin, but sometimes I can't help it. I saw an abandoned or lost baby duck being windblown trying to cross the road once - I brought him home, he lived a day. I forget what else. Our cat was rescued in the wild as a kitten, we've had her about, oh, 8 years now. So it's not all futile.

Keystone
12-14-2006, 02:24 AM
I try not to intervene with Darwin, but sometimes I can't help it.
Is Charles Darwin God?
I saw an abandoned or lost baby duck being windblown trying to cross the road once - I brought him home, he lived a day. I forget what else. Our cat was rescued in the wild as a kitten, we've had her about, oh, 8 years now. So it's not all futile.
Of course it's not.

Keystone
12-14-2006, 02:28 AM
http://www.fotosearch.com/comp/DSN/DSN004/1767479.jpg
I'd try and save the poor wee thing, but I'm not a bird expert and would probably fail.

I try to save all defenseless animals.

Johnson
12-14-2006, 03:03 AM
Is Charles Darwin God?

It was a metaphor for, say, "nature."

I found a snake laying in the middle of the road this last summer. The temperature had dropped so much that he didn't have the energy to finish crossing. There was a yellowjacket crawling on him, and it just didn't seem right to let a bee kill a snake, or a lesser creature to kill a greater one. So I plucked him up and deposited him in back with the rest of the snakes.

Ahknaton
12-14-2006, 03:08 AM
It was a metaphor for, say, "nature."

I found a snake laying in the middle of the road this last summer. The temperature had dropped so much that he didn't have the energy to finish crossing. There was a yellowjacket crawling on him, and it just didn't seem right to let a bee kill a snake, or a lesser creature to kill a greater one. So I plucked him up and deposited him in back with the rest of the snakes.
If I see earthworms lying on the footpath after a shower of rain that have been caught by the sun coming out before they make it across I sometimes pick them up and chuck them in the grass. I usually only do it if I only see one or two, because sometimes there are literally hundreds of them and I'd be there all day if I tried to save them all.

Arminius
12-14-2006, 03:15 AM
I make it a habit of being as destructive as I possibly can...so I just step on them. It makes me feel strong.

Actually, this reminds me of my Grandfather. We were near his shed and we heard some squeaking sounds. It was a baby mouse on the tractor. He brushed it off and onto the ground and then smooshed it with his shoe.

Starr
12-14-2006, 03:20 AM
If I see earthworms lying on the footpath after a shower of rain that have been caught by the sun coming out before they make it across I sometimes pick them up and chuck them in the grass. I usually only do it if I only see one or two, because sometimes there are literally hundreds of them and I'd be there all day if I tried to save them all.


I can't touch anything like that so I would not be able to do this.

Carlos Danger
12-14-2006, 03:39 AM
If I see earthworms lying on the footpath after a shower of rain that have been caught by the sun coming out before they make it across I sometimes pick them up and chuck them in the grass. I usually only do it if I only see one or two, because sometimes there are literally hundreds of them and I'd be there all day if I tried to save them all.
hehe, worms don't last long above ground in my neighbourhood

There's a LARGE crow population that roosts in a nearby park ;)

Ahknaton
12-14-2006, 03:44 AM
Does anyone remember that scene in Bladerunner where they do that test to see if you're an android by asking you what you'd do if you saw a turtle on its back in the sun and watching to see if your pupils dilate? This is starting to remind me of that.

Carlos Danger
12-14-2006, 03:48 AM
Crow tug-of-war is fun to watch :D

Carlos Danger
12-14-2006, 03:54 AM
btw Ahk - what was the story with that 'Aphrodite' duck you posted film of once?

Ahknaton
12-14-2006, 04:07 AM
btw Ahk - what was the story with that 'Aphrodite' duck you posted film of once?
It's a duck that used to visit my parent's house when I was staying with them for about a month last year. My sister and I picked it up (it was very tame around us) and put it in a rabbit hutch while I went and got my camera, then I took a short video of her releasing it. I was thinking of a soundtrack for it and by fluke it matched up almost perfectly with "Also Sprach Zarathustra" (with a little bit of speeding up and slowing down the footage) so I turned it into a little video. Even each step as she walks up to the hutch is synched up. I had it on my site for ages but I recently posted it on YouTube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OmjeguW4D1Y

Helios Panoptes
12-14-2006, 04:10 AM
Does anyone remember that scene in Bladerunner where they do that test to see if you're an android by asking you what you'd do if you saw a turtle on its back in the sun and watching to see if your pupils dilate? This is starting to remind me of that.

Yes, I remember it. I'd get shot, for sure.

antibuddha
12-14-2006, 04:45 AM
Natural selection is not going to end because you help a baby bird who fell out of a tree. Really, it's not that fragile. If you feel an instinct to help the bird, you could argue that's just as much of an evolutionary principle as ignoring it. In fact, they're probably just two competing strategies. At any rate, man has essentially nullified natural selection to a large degree with high civilization anyway, so using a "nature is cruel because it is meant to be" is a bit hypocritical coming from most speakers. Just admit you're the "psychopathic" type if that's your outlook, and have the balls not to justify it. My two cents.

Mentious
12-14-2006, 05:43 AM
If you can spot the nest easily, you should try to put it back in the nest. Give the mother birds a chance to get over their "human scent" issues if possible, "hundredth monkey" and all that. It worked for Draco.

If no nest, the bird can become an engrossing project for a child if you have any. Younger sons, and especially daughters, will be drawn to try to save the bird and cultivate nurturing instincts even if it goes bad. Later thay can develop cultural instincts by having a solemn funeral, making a cross or grave stone, and weeping over "fuzzbutter" or whatever.

If none of the two options is in easy reach, and the bird is walking, I recommend letting nature take its course and letting the chips fall where they may. Let the bird roam on.

Recently I stopped my car to do a mercy killing on a bird that had been horribly maimed by a passing car but was still making its way across the road.

Isra'il Yahya
12-14-2006, 05:56 AM
I try and help it. I've had one die in my arms when I was younger. We tried to feed it properly. It was just too weak and died. I'm sad that it died, but it was just very very weak.

Lily
12-14-2006, 06:32 AM
I can't touch anything like that so I would not be able to do this.
:eek: Me too.......

Carlos Danger
12-14-2006, 03:13 PM
What do folks suggest doing about birds (like crows) that raid the nests of other species?

Is this behavior 'evil'?

Is it morally 'right' to proverbially 'stone the crow' in this situation?

Crows have families to feed too, after all ;)

Lily
12-14-2006, 04:31 PM
What do folks suggest doing about birds (like crows) that raid the nests of other species?

Is this behavior 'evil'?

Is it morally 'right' to proverbially 'stone the crow' in this situation?

Crows have families to feed too, after all ;)
I'd still help the crow. It isn't raiding nests to be evil, just to sustain itself. Much like how humans eat meat, even from baby animals such as lamb.

Billy Score
12-14-2006, 04:42 PM
I've saved several baby birds. We had one that was injured near our car and the cats in the neighborhood were only a few feet away, about to killl it. We moved it indoors and eventually gave it to one of those shelters that nurses them back to health (or euthanizes them).

I always try to get earthworms off the sidewalk. Sometimes i used to do the same for slugs, especially if the sidewalk is busy and the slug is going to end up squashed by someone if i don't. By helping out one single animal, you arenot interefering with the natural process. For every baby bird or slug or earthworm we save a million are smashed, eaten, or die of exposure in the wild. I wouldn't have the heart to see any of them suffer. When i was much younger (maybe 4) i would fight with kids in the neighborhood when they tried to put salt on slugs. I remember trying to use water to wash the salt off one, and managed to get rid of the salt container and save another. This sort of behavior alienated me from my peers though, i can remember people in my school deliberately stepping in worms or insects after calling my attention to what was happening. That used to get me very upset, to the point where i once got into a physical confrontation with an actual schoolteacher in an attempt to save a squash bug. She took off her high heel shoe and all... Lately i've taken it with stride but people who step on insects just for the fun of it make me sick, its taking advantage for the sake of being malicious, against something that has absolutely no defense or even understanding of what is going on. I digress.

Dr. Gutberlet
12-14-2006, 05:43 PM
slugs + NaCl=:)



http://www.spyder-fonix.com/pics/SaltMaze.jpg

Carlos Danger
12-14-2006, 05:47 PM
Does anyone else here like eating snails? :)

Daniel Shays
12-14-2006, 05:50 PM
Does anyone else here like eating snails? :)
Yes, best I have had were at PEI, Canada.

Carlos Danger
12-14-2006, 05:55 PM
I assume they roast them in garlic butter in Quebec, like over in France?

In Spain they boil them in spices

Dr. Gutberlet
12-14-2006, 06:00 PM
In San Francisco they use a cardboard tube

Burrhus
12-14-2006, 07:00 PM
slugs + NaCl=:)



http://www.spyder-fonix.com/pics/SaltMaze.jpg

You are an intriguingly sick man. Are you perhaps the illegitimate offspring of one of Hachiko's teen-aged sexual escapades?

Sandee
12-14-2006, 07:11 PM
Natural selection is not going to end because you help a baby bird who fell out of a tree. Really, it's not that fragile. If you feel an instinct to help the bird, you could argue that's just as much of an evolutionary principle as ignoring it. In fact, they're probably just two competing strategies. At any rate, man has essentially nullified natural selection to a large degree with high civilization anyway, so using a "nature is cruel because it is meant to be" is a bit hypocritical coming from most speakers. Just admit you're the "psychopathic" type if that's your outlook, and have the balls not to justify it. My two cents.

I concur. It would be mostly instinctive of me to save baby birds and besides, I don't think it makes any significant difference. It's only if I was around that I would save them and how many baby birds are dying with me not around to save them? Many.

Dr. Gutberlet
12-14-2006, 07:19 PM
You are an intriguingly sick man. Are you perhaps the illegitimate offspring of one of Hachiko's teen-aged sexual escapades?


Not if you take into account that I am 32 years old, and have no Asian ancestry as far as I know. But I do appreciate compliments when they are given freely:)

Dr. Gutberlet
12-14-2006, 07:23 PM
I concur. It would be mostly instinctive of me to save baby birds and besides, I don't think it makes any significant difference. It's only if I was around that I would save them and how many baby birds are dying with me not around to save them? Many.

It would make quite a difference. The baby bird in question could potentially be a harbinger of death to millions should it spread the avian flu. Please consider this next time you are feeling compassionate towards baby birds. Adjo.

Sandee
12-14-2006, 07:37 PM
In this scenario, the baby bird in question could potentially be a harbinger of death to millions should it spread the avain flu. Please consider this next time you are feeling compassionate. Adjo.

It would be different if there was an avian flu epidemic. I mean the scenario would be different. I wouldn't be saving birds that pose a health risk to myself. Let's say, one chicken was sick on a farm and I was a farmer. Obviously the wisest step would be to quarantine it or kill it so that others don't get affected.

People try save endemic species of birds for example. Should they not try to preserve the diversity of species on our planets?

In this scenario, one baby bird falls off a tree in, say, my backyard or somewhere I happen to be. It won't make much of a difference really if I save it. If the bird is the reason bird ticks constantly harassing us, then yes, it would be foolish put it back in a nest in my own backyard for example.

Arminius
12-14-2006, 07:56 PM
Should they not try to preserve the diversity of species on our planets?

Preservation on a mass scale due to human developement is good.

In this scenario, one baby bird falls off a tree in, say, my backyard or somewhere I happen to be. It won't make much of a difference really if I save it.

Yes, a single bird matters little; if it falls due to failure to fly then I think it is natural selection. The mother has more than one egg to hatch.

Mentious
12-14-2006, 11:49 PM
I concur. It would be mostly instinctive of me to save baby birds and besides, I don't think it makes any significant difference. It's only if I was around that I would save them and how many baby birds are dying with me not around to save them? Many.
Yes, but that's conventional logic, with no magic to it.