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Nyx
12-14-2006, 04:33 AM
With greater extension of women's vocations, feminine designations are becoming a special need for the future. We ought to indulge in genuine neologisms to increase the number of our feminines, such as teacheress, doctress, singeress, etc.

Established feminine designations:

Abbess, actress, administratrix, adultress, adventuress, ambassassadress, deaconess, duchess, enchantress, executrix, giantess, goddess, governess, horsewoman, hostess, huntress, Jewess, lioness, mother, murderess, priestess, princess, procuress, prophetess, quakeress, queen, shepherdess, songstress, sorceress, stewardess, votaress, waitress, wardress (any more?)

Recent feminine designations:

Authoress, chairwoman, conductress, congresswoman, directress, doctress, draughtswoman, editress, inspectress, jurywoman, manageress, paintress, patroness, poetess, policewoman, protectress, tailoress (any more?)

Words that are, unfortunately, not provided with feminines:

Artist, aurist, clerk, cook, councillor, cyclist, lecturer, legatee, martyr, motorist, oculist, palmist, president, pupil, singer, teacher, typist

Kriger
12-14-2006, 05:19 AM
The Administratrix sounds intriguing.

Mistress of Ceremonies.

Bartendress. (?)

shanemac
12-14-2006, 05:25 AM
Race-traitoress?

This desingation could be succintly defined in a dictionary by a picture of Madonna, or that chick from Black Eyed Peas.

Johnson
12-14-2006, 05:29 AM
Dear Ix,

Please stop being bizarre.

PS: I had no idea you were this dedicated to political correctness.

Sincerely,

Slee-stak.

Nyx
12-14-2006, 05:40 AM
Actually, feminine designations are considered to be politically incorrect. Feminists have been complaining about them since the 19th century.

Johnson
12-14-2006, 05:59 AM
Some, I'm sure. But since English grammar follows that a noun with an unknown gender be designated "him/his" by default, you'd think most of them would be complaining about that and welcome feminine noun designations.

Helios Panoptes
12-14-2006, 06:01 AM
Some, I'm sure. But since English grammar follows that a noun with an unknown gender be designated "him/his" by default, you'd think most of them would be complaining about that and welcome feminine noun designations.

I often see "his/her;" also, "his" and "her" alternated throughout a paper. I make it a point to use the male pronouns, though.

Ix is right about feminine designations not being PC. They would prefer, for example, "female waiter" to "waitress."

Johnson
12-14-2006, 06:09 AM
His/Her designations were largely brought about by feminist/political correctness pressure, though.

Ahknaton
12-14-2006, 06:15 AM
Some actresses insist on being called "actors" or "female actors" because they don't feel that being labelled an "actress" gives them the same professional gravitas as their male counterparts. This is the same with some other professions. I've read that in French the situation is reversed, and feminists demand male and female designations. It just goes to show the illogical character of many PC issues. The worst are mutilations of the English language like "womyn" and "herstory".

shanemac
12-14-2006, 06:16 AM
Often, PC writers will use the pronoun "they" rather than he/she. That drives me crazy because it is bad grammar. I always use "he", especially on academic papers or whatever.

shanemac
12-14-2006, 06:19 AM
Some actresses insist on being called "actors" or "female actors" because they don't feel that being labelled an "actress" gives the same professional gravitas as their male counterparts. This is the same with some other professions. I've read that in French the situation is reversed, and feminists demand male and female designations. It just goes to show the illogical character of many PC issues. The worst are mutilations of the English language like "womyn" and "herstory".

Yeah, I've been seeing quite a few papers with "she" used for an unknown subject. Or "she" used for God.

It's ridiculous when everyone knows perfectly well that God is a white man with a long white beard who sits on a cloud, getting angry about shit like killing a spider or whatever.

ivory bill
12-14-2006, 08:19 AM
The Administratrix sounds intriguing.

Mistress of Ceremonies.

Bartendress. (?)

Aviatrix.
Better than bartendress is bartemptress.

Jimbo Gomez
12-14-2006, 08:34 AM
Perhaps we should change Starr's title to 'moderatrix'.

Starr
12-14-2006, 08:43 AM
Some actresses insist on being called "actors" or "female actors" because they don't feel that being labelled an "actress" gives them the same professional gravitas as their male counterparts. This is the same with some other professions. ".

If I was some kind of proud feminist(no comments please:p )I would think I would much rather have my own word or title, that depicts me as feminine, for example, actress, as opposed to female actor, which to me, sounds like how one would refer to a female merely doing a male's job.

Ahknaton
12-14-2006, 09:34 AM
Perhaps we should change Starr's title to 'moderatrix'.
I seem to remember crypto referring to herself as "webmistress" of Nationalist Planet.

Isabella
12-14-2006, 09:38 AM
I seem to remember crypto referring to herself as "webmistress" of Nationalist Planet.Instead of a feminine form of webmaster, it could also mean some spooky black widow themed dominatrix.

Dr. Gutberlet
12-14-2006, 01:35 PM
How about "cuntess" as opposed to "countess"?

shanemac
12-14-2006, 02:53 PM
How about "cuntess" as opposed to "countess"?

I knew it was going to be something offensive when I saw the name Dr Gutberlet... and it was.

Dr. Gutberlet
12-14-2006, 05:25 PM
I knew it was going to be something offensive when I saw the name Dr Gutberlet... and it was.

You judge me far too harshly.:whip:

Carlos Danger
12-14-2006, 05:42 PM
Some actresses insist on being called "actors" or "female actors" because they don't feel that being labelled an "actress" gives them the same professional gravitas as their male counterparts. They have a legitimate grievance here, since "actress" for a long time was a euphemism for "high class whore"

Dr. Gutberlet
12-14-2006, 05:58 PM
Q. How are women like tampons?

Heavens to Betsy
12-14-2006, 06:17 PM
Another ridiculous thread.

I'm happy to be a clerical assistant. I see no reason to be a clerical assistantess doing exactly the same job as a clerical assistant.

Dr. Gutberlet
12-14-2006, 06:29 PM
Do you at least have a nice office manageress?:deadhorse:

Carlos Danger
12-14-2006, 06:51 PM
Related subject:

Why has "Jewess" become an offensive insult?

Burrhus
12-14-2006, 07:07 PM
Perhaps we should change Starr's title to 'moderatrix'.

How about, hot-babe moderator?

sugartits
12-14-2006, 07:15 PM
I woke up this morning and the first thing I thought was 'seamstress'.

Björn
12-14-2006, 07:19 PM
Pimptress.

Heavens to Betsy
12-14-2006, 07:45 PM
Do you at least have a nice office manageress?:deadhorse:

No, I report to, at various times a medical records officer, a bed manager, a matron, and a nurse-in-charge.

With few exceptions these feminine designations make for shockingly ugly words. I don't know why anyone would be in favour of introducing more ugly words into common speech.

The Retard
12-14-2006, 08:02 PM
I think you have it wrong. Gender distinctions are fading since our society has become more "equality" minded. Nouns once masculine now refer to both male and females. Nouns gender have become irrelevant! This is probably why some people can't decide if they want to be male or female. Does anyone call a woman an executrix or a heroine anymore?

Ahmadinebobina
12-14-2006, 08:05 PM
How about "cuntess" as opposed to "countess"?

Heartily approved :rofl:

Dr. Gutberlet
12-14-2006, 08:11 PM
How about "Baroness"? A classic word, which sends chills up and down my body; no doubt due to various unresolved psychosexual issues from childhood.

il ragno
12-14-2006, 08:15 PM
Words that are, unfortunately, not provided with feminines:

Artist, aurist, clerk, cook, councillor, cyclist, lecturer, legatee, martyr, motorist, oculist, palmist, president, pupil, singer, teacher, typist


Not entirely true.

artist - artits

cyclist - cyclit

martyr - martryx

motorist - menace

lecturer - girlfriend

infantryman - dyke

President - rodham

Nyx
12-14-2006, 08:51 PM
Another ridiculous thread.

I'm happy to be a clerical assistant. I see no reason to be a clerical assistantess doing exactly the same job as a clerical assistant.The proof of real equality will not be the banishment of actress, clerical assistantess, and authoress, but its establishment on a level with actor, clerical assistant, and author. Nor does an actress, clerical assistantess, or an authoress, cease to be an actor, a clerical assstant, or an author, because she ends in -ess.

Those who oppose the use of feminine designations are not only placing their sectional interests (as women) above those of the public (general convenience of feminine designations, and the needs of the Queen's English), but seriously misjudging their own interests.

Tragic
12-15-2006, 04:14 PM
what a pointless ridiculous thread, why does Ixa have to be so freak'n weird?

Basically you want to change the english language cause you have some weird fetish for gendered words? You're worse than the psudo-feminists who write womyn and wimmin.

Heavens to Betsy
12-15-2006, 06:51 PM
The proof of real equality will not be the banishment of actress, clerical assistantess, and authoress, but its establishment on a level with actor, clerical assistant, and author. Nor does an actress, clerical assistantess, or an authoress, cease to be an actor, a clerical assstant, or an author, because she ends in -ess.

Obviously but the -ess ending remains unnecessary


Those who oppose the use of feminine designations are not only placing their sectional interests (as women) above those of the public (general convenience of feminine designations, and the needs of the Queen's English), but seriously misjudging their own interests.


Feminine designations are not convenient. They are ugly and unnecessary. Never in my life have I been inconvinenced by an ambiguity about the gender of my manager, my bank teller, my lecturer, my taxi driver etc.

Can you give my a valid example of when one would need to know the geneder of these people while they were working in a professional capacity in which their gender was not immediatly obvious? The example will need to be grave enough for me to overlook how ugly feminimie endings make most of these words.

ivory bill
12-15-2006, 06:58 PM
Can you give my a valid example of when one would need to know the geneder of these people while they were working in a professional capacity in which their gender was not immediatly obvious? The example will need to be grave enough for me to overlook how ugly feminimie endings make most of these words.

Proctologess or Urologess would be a helpful clue that the doctor might have slender hands.

Nyx
12-15-2006, 07:11 PM
Everyone knows the inconvenience of not knowing whether a doctor is a man or a woman. Hesitation in establishing doctress is extraordinary in a race known for their practicality.They are uglySubjective. I disagree.

Never in my life have I been inconvinenced by an ambiguity about the gender of my manager, my bank teller, my lecturer, my taxi driver etc. Any word that does the work of two or more by packing several ideas into one is a gain (the more developed a language, the more such words it possesses), if it expresses a compound idea which is familiar enough to need a name. Feminine designations pack the idea of gender with the idea of profession, thereby expressiong a compound notion, and a compound notion which is familiar enough that a name is desirable for it, and such words are thus a gain.


The example will need to be grave enough for me to overlook how ugly feminimie endings make most of these words.Subjective. I disagree.