PDA

View Full Version : What do you think of H.P. Lovecraft?


Nyx
03-02-2007, 01:56 AM
The reason for my absence is that I have been reading, and re-reading, the complete works of H.P Lovecraft. I finished last night. Too bad he didn't write more. Are there any fans of Lovecraft around here?

bardamu
03-02-2007, 02:10 AM
Lovecraft Rules, okay?

Nyx
03-02-2007, 02:28 AM
You don't strike me as the type who would read Lovecraft.

bardamu
03-02-2007, 02:35 AM
You don't strike me as one who would read Lovecraft.

I don't bother with fiction much anymore but I did happen to just finish a couple of collections by Lovecraft. They were great. He is an old fashioned New England bigot with a fantastically creepy imagination.

Hund
03-02-2007, 02:39 AM
When I was younger I read almost everything he'd written (it's been a long time, and I can't be specific about which ones I missed). I think it was cool but some people take it the wrong way. A hyper-intelligent person who purposely alienates himself from his people, such as yourself, probably takes it the wrong way. It isn't profound. It's just good horror that was great horror at the time.

Nyx
03-02-2007, 02:52 AM
A hyper-intelligent person who purposely alienates himself from his people, such as yourself, . . .I wish I knew what you were talking about.

It isn't profound.So ?

It's just good horror that was great horror at the time.His writing is still great. I think he is the last person who could write competently in the horror genre. No one after him writes as well as he did.

Hund
03-02-2007, 02:58 AM
He was a great writer, Neo-Galtonian.

sugartits
03-02-2007, 02:59 AM
The reason for my absence is that I have been reading, and re-reading, the complete works of H.P Lovecraft. I finished last night. Too bad he didn't write more. Are there any fans of Lovecraft around here?

I have only read Dagon, though not recently enough to recall my impressions of it. Lovecraft has often been recommended to me by friends. So many books, so little time.

What did you make of it?



Are you going to read the Elric Saga? You should.

Draco
03-02-2007, 03:00 AM
The reason for my absence is that I have been reading, and re-reading, the complete works of H.P Lovecraft. I finished last night. Too bad he didn't write more. Are there any fans of Lovecraft around here?


I'm a big fan, I own most of his works.

Hund
03-02-2007, 03:01 AM
I have only read Dagon, though not recently enough to recall my impressions of it. Lovecraft has often been recommended to me by friends. So many books, so little time.

What did you make of it?



Are you going to read the Elric Saga? You should.

I know you weren't asking me, but I'd suggest "At the Mountains of Madness".

sugartits
03-02-2007, 03:09 AM
Anyone know how the movies based on his works are? Are they sufficiently creepy?

Hund
03-02-2007, 03:16 AM
Anyone know how the movies based on his works are? Are they sufficiently creepy?

"The Re-Animator" was kind of funny, but certainly not true to the spirit of a Lovecraft book. To be honest I haven't seen a single movie based on a Lovecraft book that was scary. They've all just been stupid or stupid and senselessly gory. If you really want to check one out, I guess go with "The Re-Animator".

Oblisk
03-02-2007, 03:44 AM
I recommend A Canticle For Leibowitz.

A Canticle for Leibowitz is a post-apocalyptic science fiction novel by Walter M. Miller, Jr., first published in 1959. The first section of the book is based on an earlier short story from 1955. It won the 1961 Hugo Award for best novel.

It is set in an abbey in the Southwestern United States after a devastating nuclear war, and takes place at intervals of hundreds of years apart as civilization rebuilds itself. The plot combines elements of dark comedy with more serious examinations of the issues surrounding faith, knowledge, and power. The book was inspired by the author's witnessing of the destruction of the monastery at Monte Cassino during World War II.

BoloMK30
03-02-2007, 04:14 AM
Anyone know how the movies based on his works are? Are they sufficiently creepy?

I have several movies that were supposedly based on Lovecraft, but they
all fall short.

"The Dunwich Horror" - Starred Sandra Dee, Dean Stockwell, Ed Begley,
and Sam Jaffe. They threw in Sandra Dee as Wilbur Whateley's unnecessary
love interest (or necessary sacrifice). Produced by Roger Corman for Orion
Pictures in 1969.

"From Beyond" - Stars Jeffery Combs in one of several Lovecraft-based movies
that pretty much made his career. Just another attempt to get a full-length
movie from a short story. A Brian Yuzna production, 1986. Sucked.

"Herbert West: Reanimator" - Jeffery Combs again, played for laughs amid
oceans of blood and guts.
"Bride of Reanimator" More of the same. More Brian Yuzna Productions.
1985 and 1989. Sucked hard!

"The Unnamable" - Slightly interesting treatment of a very short story, starring
no one in particular. Produced by Dean Ramser and Jean-Paul Ouellette. 1991.
"The Unnamable II" was just silly.They DID get John Rhys-Davies in it, to his
lasting regret. 1992.

"Dagon" - No famous actors in this one. Rather than use Lovecraft's Dagon
for this one, they stole The Shadow Over Innsmouth and moved
it to a Spanish fishing village. Here were all of those tentacled mutated
fishermen, supposedly worshippers of Dagon, dancing around chanting
"Cthulhu Ftagn"! What gives? Saw it on television, didn't get the producer's
name or the year. It was recent. Not bad, actually.

"Necronomicon" - An incredibly bad paste-up of several different Lovecraft
themes. Had Jeffery Combs as H.P.Lovecraft himself. One of the bits
had Cthulhu in the basement in the Exham Priory from The Rats In The Walls!
Really Bad! David Warner was in it, too. 1993.

An Oldie: "Die, Monster, Die!" - With Boris Karloff in a loose interpretation
of The Colour Out Of Space. Black and white, sometime in the fifties.

I have ALL of Lovecraft's works, even including his collected letters, in my
Pleasant Dreams! bookcase.

Vasily Zaitsev
03-02-2007, 05:09 AM
Big Lovecraft fan.

Which editions of his works do you have, Ix? I generally recommend the collections edited by S.T. Joshi because of the foot/endnotes.

Lovecraft-based cinema tends to be disappointing. The Re-Animator was entertaining, but I wouldn't call it a good movie. Dagon, which as a previous poster mentioned was really more an adaptation of The Shadow Over Innsmouth, was worth watching for the flashback sequences. Great visuals for the rituals and holy items of the cult of the Great Old Ones.

Though not taken from any of Lovecraft's stories, the most recent movie I can think of that came close to capturing the feel of his tales was 2002's Darkness. Anna Paquin was the lead.

Dr. Gutberlet
03-02-2007, 05:23 AM
Incredible author. I have been a huge fan of his work since the mid 1990s. I like his racial views and use of language. However, I hate what August Derleth has done with the Mythos. H.P. Lovecraft never intended for it to go that way. My fav story? "The Colour Out of Space".

Jake Featherston
03-02-2007, 11:52 AM
I've been a huge Lovecraft since at least 1982. He's my favorite author in fiction, period. My favorite story is "The Shadow Over Innsmouth." "The Call of Cthulhu," "The Colour Out of Space," and "The Dunwich Horror" are all excellent as well. He wrote one novel, The Strange Case of Dr. Charles Dexter Ward. They made a movie based on that about 15 years ago that while not excellent, is a Hell of a lot better than any of the other Lovecraft cinema-related examples cited in this thread. It was called "The Resurrected," and here is a LINK (http://www.amazon.com/Resurrected-John-Terry/dp/630232792X/ref=sr_1_5/102-6549799-9454569?ie=UTF8&s=video&qid=1172835781&sr=8-5) to where one may purchase it on VHS at Amazon.

Here is a LINK (http://www.hplfilmfestival.com/) to the H.P. Lovecraft Film Festival, which will be held this year in both Portland, Oregon and Austin, Texas. If I can afford to do so, I will be attending the Portland event this October.

Here is a LINK (http://www.unfilmable.com/) to a film company that specializes in making low-budget, independent Lovecraft-themed films. I have two VHS cassettes filled with short, Lovecraft-themed films which were shown at the H.P. Lovecraft Film Festival, and I believe some of those films are included one one or more their short cinema collection DVDs. Volume One of the "Best of the H.P. Lovecraft Film Festival" has a few really excellent pieces, including a 15-minute, very faithful rendition of "The Music of Erich Zann." Volume II is not so good. These items, albeit likely now on DVD, can no doubt be purchased somewhere online; I only recommend Volume One.

Like another poster on this thread, I too recommend reading the annotated collections of H.P. Lovecraft that are edited by S.T. Joshi; his footnotes are interesting.

WFHermans
03-02-2007, 01:33 PM
H.P. Lovecraft is the greatest genius of American literature. If only he had lived beyond just 46 years.

The traditional enemies of freedom of speech have been trying to destroy H.P. Lovecraft's reputation by constantly hailing his lower quality works over his absolute masterpieces.

I am planning to reread his works in chronological order.

Oblisk
03-02-2007, 03:11 PM
I have never read any Lovecraft works, what would be a good one to start with?

Jake Featherston
03-02-2007, 03:40 PM
I have never read any Lovecraft works, what would be a good one to start with?

Right here:

http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/P/0440506603.01._BO2,204,203,200_PIlitb-dp-500-arrow,TopRight,45,-64_OU01_AA240_SH20_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg

LINK to Amazon.com listing (http://www.amazon.com/Annotated-H-P-Lovecraft-S-Joshi/dp/0440506603/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-6549799-9454569?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1172849935&sr=1-1)

Oblisk
03-02-2007, 03:47 PM
Right here:

http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/P/0440506603.01._BO2,204,203,200_PIlitb-dp-500-arrow,TopRight,45,-64_OU01_AA240_SH20_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg

LINK to Amazon.com listing (http://www.amazon.com/Annotated-H-P-Lovecraft-S-Joshi/dp/0440506603/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-6549799-9454569?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1172849935&sr=1-1)

First words on the review:

This is definitely not a "beginner's" Lovecraft.

:confused:

Jake Featherston
03-02-2007, 03:58 PM
First words on the review:

This is definitely not a "beginner's" Lovecraft.

:confused:


Well, pretty much any collection of his short stories will work, but you definitely want one that includes "The Call of Cthulhu," since that is kind of his seminal piece, and ideally one that also has "The Shadow Over Innsmouth." I'm pretty sure they still sell a volume called The Lurking Fear and Other Stories, or something very similar to that, which contains both those tales.

Jake Featherston
03-02-2007, 04:00 PM
Here it is:

http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/P/0345326040.01._BO2,204,203,200_PIlitb-dp-500-arrow,TopRight,45,-64_OU01_AA240_SH20_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg

LINK to Amazon.com listing (http://www.amazon.com/Lurking-Fear-Other-Stories-Book/dp/0345326040/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-6549799-9454569?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1172851131&sr=1-1)

WFHermans
03-02-2007, 04:02 PM
Chronological order would be best I suggest, in which case you would start with Dagon.

A chronological list, and the works themselves, can easily be found on the internet.

I would read the works themselves, not any "annotations" by insidious jews and devious mongrels.

Jake Featherston
03-02-2007, 04:08 PM
This is probably an excellent place to start:

http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/P/1931082723.01._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-dp-500-arrow,TopRight,45,-64_OU01_AA240_SH20_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg

LINK to Amazon.com listing (http://www.amazon.com/H-P-Lovecraft-Library-America/dp/1931082723/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-6549799-9454569?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1172851613&sr=1-1)

Dr. Gutberlet
03-02-2007, 04:59 PM
Any opinions on the actions of August Derleth with regards to his altering/expanding of the Cthulu Mythos??!

WFHermans
03-02-2007, 06:01 PM
I vaguely remember how I several times tried to read a story by August Derleth that was supposed to have been based on an unfinished tale by H.P.Lovecraft.

Dr. Gutberlet
03-02-2007, 06:04 PM
I vaguely remember how I several times tried to read a story by August Derleth that was supposed to have been based on an unfinished tale by H.P.Lovecraft.

Derleth turned the Mythos into an "X-Men vs. Brotherhood of Evil Mutants" type of thing, which Lovecraft never intended.

BoloMK30
03-02-2007, 10:31 PM
Derleth turned the Mythos into an "X-Men vs. Brotherhood of Evil Mutants" type of thing, which Lovecraft never intended.

I don't think that Lovecraft would have approved of Derleth's introduction
of cosmic "good guys" to counter the "evil" Great Old Ones.

Lovecraft's universe was a pitiless, uncaring, and sometimes actively-
hostile place. If humans survived in it, it was because of their collective
insignificance. Humans are the dust-mites of the universe.

Draco
03-02-2007, 11:48 PM
This is probably an excellent place to start:

http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/P/1931082723.01._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-dp-500-arrow,TopRight,45,-64_OU01_AA240_SH20_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg

LINK to Amazon.com listing (http://www.amazon.com/H-P-Lovecraft-Library-America/dp/1931082723/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-6549799-9454569?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1172851613&sr=1-1)

I second this nomination.

Also, for his dream cycle works, check out:

http://ec2.images-amazon.com/images/P/0345384210.01._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-dp-500-arrow,TopRight,45,-64_OU01_AA240_SH20_SCLZZZZZZZ_V44911271_.jpg

For the record, my favorite story was The Horror at Red Hook.

Oblisk
03-03-2007, 06:29 AM
Please keep the list coming, I shall be going to the bookstore this weekend.

Jake Featherston
03-03-2007, 06:31 AM
Any opinions on the actions of August Derleth with regards to his altering/expanding of the Cthulu Mythos??!

Some of his stuff was pretty good; some of it sucked. None of it was up to Lovecraft's level.

Jake Featherston
03-03-2007, 06:34 AM
For the record, my favorite story was The Horror at Red Hook.

Yes, "The Horror at Red Hook" is an excellent story. Many anthologies leave it out, since its the most explicitly racialist of all his tales. "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" is also very racialist, but less obviously so. But that's not the only reason its my favorite Lovecraft story; its also really creepy and interesting in its own right.

Jake Featherston
03-03-2007, 06:37 AM
Please keep the list coming, I shall be going to the bookstore this weekend.

There's also a Penguin Classics edition of Lovecraft.

http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/P/0141182342.01._BO2,204,203,200_PIlitb-dp-500-arrow,TopRight,45,-64_OU01_AA240_SH20_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg

LINK to Amazon.com listing (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0141182342/sr/ref=pd_cp_b_title/102-6549799-9454569?ie=UTF8&qid=1172903776&sr=1-2)

Vasily Zaitsev
03-03-2007, 06:47 AM
There's also a Penguin Classics edition of Lovecraft.

http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/P/0141182342.01._BO2,204,203,200_PIlitb-dp-500-arrow,TopRight,45,-64_OU01_AA240_SH20_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg

LINK to Amazon.com listing (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0141182342/sr/ref=pd_cp_b_title/102-6549799-9454569?ie=UTF8&qid=1172903776&sr=1-2)

There are three volumes of Lovecraft's works from Penguin Classics and they're worth noting due to S.T. Joshi's editing and their lower prices and greater availability relative to the editions Joshi's done for Necronomicon and Arkham House.

Hund
03-03-2007, 09:55 AM
Please keep the list coming, I shall be going to the bookstore this weekend.

I want to add my recommendation to theirs to get whatever anthology has "Shadow Over Innsmouth". So far as I remember it was his best one. However, it is only a short story. "At the Mountains of Madness", as I recall, is about the longest story he wrote and was pretty damned good. You really should get both.

WFHermans
03-03-2007, 11:13 AM
"The Street" is another great early story that is often not included in anthologies. Here's why.

"It was said that the swart men who dwelt in the Street and congregated in its rotting edifices were the brains of a hideous revolution, that at their word and command many millions of brainless, besotted beasts would stretch forth their noisome talons from the slums of a thousand cities, burning, slaying, and destroying till the land of our fathers should be no more."

Jake Featherston
03-03-2007, 03:28 PM
"The Street" is another great early story that is often not included in anthologies.

Oh yeah, "The Street" is even more explicitly racialist than "The Horror at Red Hook." The latter is an overall better story. "The Street" is available (I have it), but its definitely not as easy to find as many of his other tales.

Fenris
03-03-2007, 03:53 PM
Outstanding amateur movie:

http://www.cthulhulives.org/cocmovie/

BoloMK30
03-03-2007, 09:39 PM
My personal favorite is The Case Of Charles Dexter Ward, a masterful
tale of evil ancestral memory and ancient sorcery. Brian Lumley took part
of this story and expanded on it in his long Necroscope series.

Castle Ferenczy in the Carpathian Mountains, with Baron Ferenczy not
only a sorceror but a Wamphyr of prehistoric origin.

Lovecraft ROCKS!

Dr. Gutberlet
03-03-2007, 09:42 PM
I am not a big fan of Lovecraft's more abstract stories; ie. Dreamquest of Unknown Kadath, etc.

Draco
03-04-2007, 02:28 PM
I'd love to see a major studio make At The Mountains Of Madness. It could easily be brought into a modern context, with all the people doing research in Antarctica, and special effects have advanced to the point that a shoggoth could be done without looking laughable.

What jive-talkin black sidekick will be appointed for Dyer?

Will it be Chris Tucker?

http://www.cannes-fest.com/besson/images/5elem4.gif

Oh shit yo, dat shoggoth nigga beez eatin peoples heads!

I prefer my Lovecraft without the corrupting influence of Hymiewood; the story would be ruined forever if the jews decided to remake it. In addition to some annoying negroes, I'm sure the lead white character would be an evil nazi bent on enslaving the Elder Things, until some witty kike scientistc thrown in for good measure and the negro team up to stop him.

No thank you.

Vasily Zaitsev
03-04-2007, 04:14 PM
I'd love to see a major studio make At The Mountains Of Madness.

Already been done.

It was called Aliens Vs. Predator

WFHermans
03-04-2007, 05:04 PM
Some of Lovecraft's stories could be filmed without special effects, for instance The Statement of Randolph Carter. That one story is better than everything Stephen King ever wrote and would write if he would live aeons more.

WFHermans
03-07-2007, 10:25 PM
According to Sprague de Camp's biography, The Tomb was Lovecraft's first story and Dagon only the second.

Lovecraft kept a notebook in which he jotted down ideas for stories. Here's one idea:

Rats multiply and exterminate first a single city & then all mankind. Increased size and intelligence. :jew: :jew: :jew:

WFHermans
03-08-2007, 11:25 AM
True. Lovecraft thought highly of the intelligence of jews. I think he had niggers in mind.

The negro is fundamentally the biological inferior of all White and even Mongolian races, and the Northern people must occasionally be reminded of the danger which they incur by admitting him too freely to the privileges of society and government.

His third story Polaris, often left out of anthologies, is about the danger of Mongoloids ("squat, hellish yellow fiends").

WFHermans
03-12-2007, 02:03 PM
List of H.P. Lovecraft's fiction (http://www.hplovecraft.com/writings/fiction/chrono.asp), chronologically ordered. The original webpage has links to most of the stories, unfortunately the rare ones that are not easy to find in bookform are not linked.

# 1917, June: The Tomb
# 1917, July: Dagon
# 1917: A Reminiscence of Dr. Samuel Johnson
# 1917: Sweet Ermengarde
# 1918, May?: Polaris
# 1918: The Mystery of Murdon Grange (nonextant)
# 1918/19: The Green Meadow (with Winifred V. Jackson)
# 1919: Beyond the Wall of Sleep
# 1919: Memory
# 1919: Old Bugs
# 1919, September 16: The Transition of Juan Romero
# 1919, November: The White Ship
# 1919, December 3: The Doom That Came to Sarnath
# 1919, December: The Statement of Randolph Carter
# 1920, January 28: The Terrible Old Man
# 1920: The Tree
# 1920, June 15: The Cats of Ulthar
# 1920: The Temple
# 1920: Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family
# 1920?: The Street
# 1920?: Life and Death (lost)
# 1920: Poetry and the Gods (with Anna Helen Crofts)
# 1920, early November: Celepha´s
# 1920, November 16: From Beyond
# 1920, early December: Nyarlathotep
# 1920, December 12: The Picture in the House
# 1920/21: The Crawling Chaos (with Winifred V. Jackson)
# 1920/21: Ex Oblivione
# 1921, January: The Nameless City
# 1921, February 28: The Quest of Iranon
# 1921, March: The Moon-Bog
# 1921: The Outsider
# 1921, August 14: The Other Gods
# 1921, December: The Music of Erich Zann
# 1921, September to mid-1922: Herbert West—Reanimator
# 1922, March: Hypnos
# 1922, June 5: What the Moon Brings
# 1922, June: Azathoth
# 1922, June: The Horror at Martin’s Beach (with Sonia H. Greene)
# 1922, September: The Hound
# 1922, November: The Lurking Fear
# 1923, August-September: The Rats in the Walls
# 1923, September: The Unnamable
# 1923: Ashes (with C. M. Eddy, Jr.)
# 1923: The Ghost-Eater (with C. M. Eddy, Jr.)
# 1923: The Loved Dead (with C. M. Eddy, Jr.)
# 1923, October: The Festival
# 1924?: Deaf, Dumb, and Blind (with C. M. Eddy, Jr.)
# 1924, February-March: Under the Pyramids (with Harry Houdini)
# 1924, October 16-19: The Shunned House
# 1925, August 1-2: The Horror at Red Hook
# 1925, August 11: He
# 1925, September 18: In the Vault
# 1926?: The Descendant
# 1926, March: Cool Air
# 1926, Summer: The Call of Cthulhu
# 1926, July-October: Two Black Bottles (with Wilfred Blanch Talman)
# 1926: Pickman’s Model
# 1926: The Silver Key
# 1926, November 9: The Strange High House in the Mist
# 1926, Autumn? to 1927, January 22: The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath
# 1927, January to March 1: The Case of Charles Dexter Ward
# 1927, March: The Colour Out of Space
# 1927, November 2: The Very Old Folk
# 1927, November 25: The Thing in the Moonlight (spurious)
# 1927: The Last Test (with Adolphe de Castro)
# 1927: History of the Necronomicon
# 1928: The Curse of Yig (with Zealia Bishop)
# 1928?: Ibid
# 1928, Summer: The Dunwich Horror
# 1929?: The Electric Executioner (with Adolphe de Castro)
# 1929, December to early 1930: The Mound (with Zealia Bishop)
# 1930, May: Medusa’s Coil (with Zealia Bishop)
# 1930, February 24 to September 26: The Whisperer in Darkness
# 1931, February to March 22: At the Mountains of Madness
# 1931, November? to December 3: The Shadow Over Innsmouth
# late 1931: The Trap (with Henry S. Whitehead)
# 1932, January to February 28: The Dreams in the Witch House
# 1932: The Man of Stone (with Hazel Heald)
# 1932, October: The Horror in the Museum (with Hazel Heald)
# 1932, October to 1933, April: Through the Gates of the Silver Key (with E. Hoffmann Price)
# 1933: Winged Death (with Hazel Heald)
# 1933: Out of the Aeons (with Hazel Heald)
# 1933, August 21-24: The Thing on the Doorstep
# 1933, October: The Evil Clergyman
# 1933/35: The Horror in the Burying-Ground (with Hazel Heald)
# late 1933?: The Book
# 1934, May: The Tree on the Hill (with Duane W. Rimel)
# 1934, June: The Battle that Ended the Century (with R. H. Barlow)
# 1934, November to 1935, March: The Shadow Out of Time
# 1935, January: “Till A’ the Seas” (with R.H. Barlow)
# 1935, June: Collapsing Cosmoses (with R.H. Barlow)
# 1935, August: The Challenge from Beyond (with C. L. Moore; A. Merritt; Robert E. Howard, and Frank Belknap Long)
# 1935, September: The Disinterment (with Duane W. Rimel)
# 1935, October: The Diary of Alonzo Typer (with William Lumley)
# 1935, November: The Haunter of the Dark
# 1936, January: In the Walls of Eryx (with Kenneth Sterling)
# 1936, Autumn?: The Night Ocean (with R.H. Barlow)