The Phora  

Go Back   The Phora > International Forums > The Phora - Hrvatska > Znanstveni kutak
User Name
Password
Blog Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

Znanstveni kutak Genetika, antropologija, psihologija, biologija, ekonomija, tehnologija, oružje, okultno... Neka se zna da smo i pametni.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-06-2006, 07:12 PM
Ace Rimmer's Avatar
Ace Rimmer Ace Rimmer is offline
Smoke me a kipper, I'll be back for breakfast!
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Dalmatia, Croatia
Posts: 4,465
Country: Confederacy (CSA)
Exclamation the year of the Tesla

On 27th March 2006 Ministry of Science, Education and Sports introduced the Program of celebration the Year of Nikola Tesla in Republic of Croatia. Firstly, there were a few words of introduction about both the very anniversary and the famous scientist. Republic of Croatia dedicates the year of 2006 to Nikola Tesla, the worldly outstanding scientist and inventor, born on 10th July 1856 in Smiljan, under the motion that the Committee of Education, Science and Culture of Croatian Parliament was considered and adopted on their 17th sitting. On that occasion, the Committee has made a decision that 2006 in Croatia is the "Year of Nikola Tesla". Based on that decision there has been established the Implement Committee at the Croatian Parliament for the celebration of the Year of Nikola Tesla in Croatia. The Organizing Committee has been established as well constituted of representatives of the Croatian Parliament, the Croatian Parliament, Croatian Academy of Science and Art as well as of the individuals and representatives of eminent science organizations and institutions. According to the same decision the Ministry of Science, Education and Sports in cooperation with the Ministry of Culture is entrusted with carrying out the program that will celebrate the Year of Nikola Tesla.
Tesla's words: "My project was slowed down by the laws of nature". He was much beyond his time. Tesla would rather define himself as a "discoverer" than an "inventor" considering that he used to open the ways to others. Today, quite legitimately, Tesla is also mentioned as a "man who invented 20th century". However, the fortune of his discoveries leads not only that he invented 20th but also 21st century, because the significance of some of his discoveries is about to conceive yet. About 700 patents go together with Tesla's name. Here are some of them: Electromagnetic Coil, induction motor, alternate currents of high frequency, arc lamp, vacuum photograph tube, wireless electric power transmission, radio, remote conduct as a basis of nowadays robot science, cosmic radio waves and the use of ionosphere in science. He became a doctor of honour of Zagreb University in 1926. Since 1985, one link of the University of Zagreb rector's chain has had the image of Nikola Tesla among other meritorious Croatian scientists.
In recognition of Tesla's merit up to now, there have been given names after him as follows: magnetic flux density, an asteroid, a Moon crater, science and research institutes, as well as to numerous structures and museums dedicated to his discoveries. Ever since 1976 worldly acknowledged Association of scientists, IEEE, has annually given award "Nikola Tesla" to the scientists around the world. In spite of that, there were many situations when he was neglected and denied.

www.nikolatesla.hr
__________________


Lily says (22:03):
hi
you need to teach me croat tourist words
my mum asked me if i knew anything
and i said all i know is jebem ti mater
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-06-2006, 08:03 PM
Sargon's Avatar
Sargon Sargon is offline
heathen
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Belgrade
Age: 32
Posts: 1,021
Country: Serbia
Default

He was Serb and that is more that obviously his father was ortodox monk and Tesla on his funeral asked to sing Serbian national song ,,Tamo Daleko’’
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-06-2006, 08:04 PM
Ace Rimmer's Avatar
Ace Rimmer Ace Rimmer is offline
Smoke me a kipper, I'll be back for breakfast!
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Dalmatia, Croatia
Posts: 4,465
Country: Confederacy (CSA)
Default

Tesla was Croatian.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-06-2006, 08:06 PM
Sargon's Avatar
Sargon Sargon is offline
heathen
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Belgrade
Age: 32
Posts: 1,021
Country: Serbia
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gromovnik
Tesla was Croatian.
No he was Serbian as you know, I really don't know why you need to lie
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-06-2006, 08:09 PM
Ace Rimmer's Avatar
Ace Rimmer Ace Rimmer is offline
Smoke me a kipper, I'll be back for breakfast!
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Dalmatia, Croatia
Posts: 4,465
Country: Confederacy (CSA)
Default

No, he was Croatian, it is not a lie.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-06-2006, 08:14 PM
Sargon's Avatar
Sargon Sargon is offline
heathen
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Belgrade
Age: 32
Posts: 1,021
Country: Serbia
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gromovnik
No, he was Croatian, it is not a lie.
Which Croatian would waned Serbian national song on his funeral, which Croatian have ortodox monk as father
What will be if I provide lot of evidence about Tesla’s origin
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-06-2006, 08:28 PM
Ace Rimmer's Avatar
Ace Rimmer Ace Rimmer is offline
Smoke me a kipper, I'll be back for breakfast!
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Dalmatia, Croatia
Posts: 4,465
Country: Confederacy (CSA)
Default

This is not of my concern , you can argue your point , however
the fact remains that Tesla was Croatian and is considered as such by international circles.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-06-2006, 09:08 PM
Watzy Watzy is offline
Established member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Croatia
Posts: 2,566
Country: Croatia
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dimitrije
his father was ortodox monk
Sure. his parents were Orthodox Vlacks with no connection to Serbia whatsoever. Tesla is a Vlack surname more frequent amongst Dinaric Croats than 'Serbs'.

Quote:
Tesla on his funeral asked to sing Serbian national song ,,Tamo Daleko’’

That's a Croatian song from Brač, and it was popular back than. It goes: "tamo daleko kraj mora tamo je ljubav moja". The song was preformed by Croatian violinist Zlatko Balokovic.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-06-2006, 10:56 PM
Jebivjetar Jebivjetar is offline
Established member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: somewhere
Posts: 1,785
Country: Molvania
Default

Tesla is overrated.
__________________
.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-07-2006, 12:53 AM
Sargon's Avatar
Sargon Sargon is offline
heathen
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Belgrade
Age: 32
Posts: 1,021
Country: Serbia
Default

Nikola Tesla was born a subject of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1856 in a mountainous area of the Balkan Peninsula known as Lika. His father Milutin, and his mother Djuka, were both Serbian by origin. Tesla's father was a stern but loving Orthodox priest, who was also a gifted writer and poet. At a young age, Tesla immersed himself in his father's library. Tesla's mother was a hard working woman of many talents who created appliances to help with home and farm responsibilities. One of these was a mechanical eggbeater. Tesla attributed all of his inventive instincts to his mother.

Tesla began his education at home and later attended gymnasium in Carlstadt, excelling in his studies along the way. An early sign of his genius, he was able to perform integral calculus in his mind, prompting his teachers to think he was cheating. During this period young "Niko" saw a steel engraving of Niagara Falls. In his imagination there appeared a huge water wheel being turned by the powerful cataract. He said to an uncle that he would go to America one day and capture energy in this way. Thirty years later he did exactly that. Despite his early creativity, Tesla did not begin to think of himself as an inventor until he was a young adult.

Passionate about mathematics and sciences, Tesla had his heart set on becoming an engineer but was "constantly oppressed" by his father's insistence that he enter the priesthood. At age seventeen, Tesla contracted cholera and craftily exacted an important concession from his father: the older Tesla promised his son that if he survived, he would be allowed to attend the renowned Austrian Polytechnic School at Graz to study engineering. Tesla's wish became a reality.

At the Polytechnic school Tesla began his studies in mechanical and electrical engineering. One day a physics teacher showed Tesla's class a new Gramme dynamo that—by employing direct current—could be used as both a motor and a generator. After watching it for a time, Tesla suggested it might be possible to do away with a set of inefficient sparking connections known as commutators. This, his amused professor said, would be like building a perpetual motion machine! Not even Tesla could hope to achieve such a feat. For the next several years the challenge obsessed Tesla, who instinctively knew that the solution lay in electric currents that alternated.

It wasn't until age twenty-four, when Tesla was living in Budapest and working for the Central Telephone Exchange, that the answer came to him:

One afternoon, which is ever present in my recollection, I was enjoying a walk with my friend in the city park and reciting poetry. At that age I knew entire books by heart, word for word. One of these was Goethe's Faust. The sun was just setting and reminded me of a glorious passage:

The glow retreats, done is the day of toil;
It yonder hastes, new fields of life exploring;
Ah, that no wing can lift me from the soil
Upon its track to follow, follow soaring!

As I uttered these inspiring words the idea came like a flash of lightning and in an instant the truth was revealed. I drew with a stick on the sand the diagram shown six years later in my address before the American Institute of Electrical Engineers.

This was the invention of the induction motor, a technological advance that would soon change the world.


Stock certificate for the Tesla Electric Light and Manufacturing Company .

Following his discovery in Budapest, Tesla was hired by electric power companies in Strasbourg and Paris to improve their DC generation facilities. In Germany and France, he attempted to interest investors in his concept for an AC motor, but had no success. It was clear that in order to realize his idea, he would have to meet the greatest electrical engineer in the world—Thomas Alva Edison.

At age 28, Nikola Tesla arrived in New York City and was shocked by what he discovered. "What I had left was beautiful, artistic and fascinating in every way; what I saw here was machined, rough and unattractive. It [America] is a century behind Europe in civilization." The Serbian immigrant had four cents in his pocket, some mathematical computations, a drawing of an idea for a flying machine, and a letter of introduction from Charles Batchelor, one of Edison's business associates in Europe.

Electricity was first introduced to New York in the late 1870s. Edison's incandescent lamp had created an astonishing demand for electric power. And his DC power station on Pearl Street in lower Manhattan was quickly becoming a monopoly. On the streets, single poles carried dozens of crooked crossbeams supporting sagging wires, and the exposed electrical wiring was a constant danger. Unsuspecting children would scale the poles only to meet an untimely electrical demise. The residents of Brooklyn became so accustomed to dodging shocks from electric trolley tracks that their baseball team was called the Brooklyn Dodgers. In spite of the perils, wealthy New Yorkers rushed to have their homes wired, the most important being the banker, J.P. Morgan, who had invested heavily in Edison.

It was into this state of affairs that the 6'4" immigrant from Eastern Europe entered Edison's office. Thrilled and terrified to meet his hero, Tesla handed Edison his letter of recommendation: It read: "My Dear Edison: I know two great men and you are one of them. The other is this young man!" Tesla proceeded to describe the engineering work he had done, and his plans for an alternating current motor.

Edison knew little of alternating current and did not care to learn more about it. In short, AC power sounded like competition to Edison. But there was something different about Tesla, and Edison immediately hired him to make improvements in his DC generation plants. Tesla claimed that Edison promised him $50,000 if he succeeded, perhaps thinking it an impossible undertaking. But the potential of so much money appealed mightily to the impoverished immigrant.

Both Tesla and Edison shared a common trait of genius in that neither of them seemed to need much sleep. Edison could go for days, taking occasional catnaps on a sofa in his office. Tesla claimed that his working hours at the Edison Machine Works were 10:30 a.m. till 5 a.m. the next day. Even into old age Tesla said he only slept two or three hours a night.

That's where the similarity ended. Tesla relied on moments of inspiration, perceiving the invention in his brain in precise detail before moving to the construction stage. Edison was a trial and error man who described invention as five percent inspiration and 95 percent perspiration. Edison was self-taught. Tesla had a formal European education.

It was only a matter of time until their differences would lead to conflict.

Several months after Edison employed him, Tesla announced that his work was successfully completed. When Tesla asked to be paid, however, Edison seemed astonished. He explained that the offer of $50,000 had been made in jest. "When you become a full-fledged American you will appreciate an American joke," Edison said. Shocked and disgusted, Tesla immediately resigned.

Word began to spread that a foreigner of unusual talent was digging ditches to stay alive. Investors approached Tesla and asked him to develop an improved method for arc lighting. Although this was not the opportunity he had hoped for, the group was willing to finance the Tesla Electric Light Company. The proud new owner set to work and invented a unique arc lamp of beautiful design and efficiency. Unfortunately, all of the money earned went to the investors and all Tesla got was a stack of worthless stock certificates.

But his luck was about to change. Mr. A.K. Brown of the Western Union Company, agreed to invest in Tesla's idea for an AC motor. In a small laboratory just a short distance from Edison's office, Tesla quickly developed all the components for the system of AC power generation and transmission that is used universally throughout the world today. "The motors I build there," said Tesla, "were exactly as I imagined them. I made no attempt to improve the design, but merely reproduced the pictures as they appeared to my vision and the operation was always as I expected." The battle to produce his motor was over. But the struggle to introduce it commercially was only just beginning.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT. The time now is 03:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Page generated in 0.07024 seconds with 10 queries